Science & Health

Unravelling life’s origin

There is still so much we don’t understand about the origin of life on Earth. The definition of life itself ...
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Biology by the book

Back in 1987, around the beginnings of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Australia, as a Senior Medical Officer I had volunteered ...
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To restore trust in science, we need great storytellers

All good scientists are sceptics. Scepticism is central to the scientific method, which is basically designed to prevent the most ...
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How to inoculate against climate misinformation

Last year, the world experienced the hottest day ever recorded, as we endured the first year where temperatures were 1.5°C warmer ...
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Intellectual humility is a key ingredient for scientific progress

The virtue of intellectual humility is getting a lot of attention. It’s heralded as a part of wisdom, an aid to self-improvement and ...
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The real work of science communicators

A stir went through the Australian science communication community last month, caused by an article with the headline ‘Science communicators ...
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Modern medicine’s scientific roots in the Middle Ages

Nothing calls to mind nonsensical treatments and bizarre religious healing rituals as easily as the notion of Dark Age medicine. ...
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Sagan’s experiment a guiding light in the search for life

It’s been 30 years since a group of scientists led by Carl Sagan found evidence for life on Earth using ...
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Turning back the clock on the evolution of animals

There are estimated to be nearly 8 million species of animals living today, making up the majority of Earth’s documented biodiversity and ...
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Does AI have a right to free speech?

The world has witnessed breathtaking advances in generative artificial intelligence (AI), with ChatGPT being one of the best known examples. ...
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Complexity and the patterns of evolution

Depending upon how you do the counting, there are around 9 million species on Earth, from the simplest single-celled organisms to humans. ...
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Non-overlapping magisteria: Why Gould got it wrong

This article is part of our ‘Celebrate Science’ feature series to mark National Science Week. It was originally published in ...
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